17 4 / 2014

"No ha muerto. Ha iniciado
un viaje atardecido.
De azul en azul claro
—de cielo en cielo— ha ido
por la senda del sueño
con su arcángel de lino."

Gabriel García Márquez, ‘Geografía Celeste’ (primera parte)  (via lefabuleuxdestindunpoete)

15 4 / 2014

(Fuente: lescoeurs)

15 4 / 2014

"Si tu aimes quelqu’un, tu l’aimes avec ses cicatrices, sa tristesse et ses défauts."

15 4 / 2014

wnderlst:

Total Lunar Eclipse (April 15, 2014) | Matthew Crowley

wnderlst:

Total Lunar Eclipse (April 15, 2014) | Matthew Crowley

14 4 / 2014

"El verbo leer, como el verbo amar y el verbo soñar, no soporta el modo imperativo."

Jorge Luis Borges (via hojeandolibros)

14 4 / 2014

14 4 / 2014

"Soy un raro. No puedo soportar al ser humano en su estado actual, he de ser engañado. Los psiquiatras deben tener un término para designar eso, yo también lo tengo para los psiquiatras."

Escritos de un viejo indecente, Charles Bukowski. (via kjernen)

14 4 / 2014

mxfail:

Es Lunes, son vacaciones y nos vamos a poner finos…

¡Qué barbaridad!  Jajaja

mxfail:

Es Lunes, son vacaciones y nos vamos a poner finos…

¡Qué barbaridad! Jajaja

14 4 / 2014

teesperoentrepoesias:

"Mi sueño es un sueño sin alternativas y quiero morir al pie de la letra del lugar común que asegura que morir es soñar"


A 41 años de la muerte de Alejandra Pizarnik.

(vía nosomosdelmundo)

31 3 / 2014

allthingslinguistic:

You’ve probably played The Great Language Game in the past few months: the one where you listen to short audio clips and try to identify the language being spoken. The creator of the game recently released the results of over 16 million plays of the game as a json file for anyone to analyze, along with a few graphs

Hedvig Skirgård has a guest post at Replicated Typo analyzing these results in more depth by creating clusters showing which languages get confused with each other the most often. 

It would seem, to no-one’s surprise, that there are patterns reflecting that more closely related languages are more easily confused with each other. The biggest split in the data appears to be between ‘Western’ languages and Non-Western languages.  This makes sense if the majority of the players are from the West.

The Slavic languages form a cluster and so do the Germanic and Romance to a certain degree. There are however exceptions, Portuguese is for example closer to the Slavic than Romance (this conforms to one of the authors intuition). Interestingly, Romanian and Portuguese appear to be further from Spanish and Italian than Albanian and Greek.

As for the non-Indo-European languages in the sample it would appear to be much more confusion in general and potentially areal patterns emerging. The worst confusion is between African and Austronesian languages.  Hindi and Nepali are Indo-European languages, but end up closer to their Dravidian geographical neighbours. The most clear example of the geographical associations is perhaps that Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean and Japanese are confounded even though they are very different structurally.

The full post also includes fascinating cluster graphs comparing how languages are confused differently depending on the (automatically-detected) location of the respondent. For example: 

It’s interesting to note that players from the West place Hebrew and Yiddish together with Germanic languages, while players from Asia place Yiddish with German, but Hebrew with Semitic languages.